Recollections and reflections

Reminiscences, Rafi Ahmad Kidwai

I first came in contact with Subhas Bose in 1923 at Delhi when the Congress was divided into two groups over the question of what was known as 'Council Entry.'...Subhas Babu, as the favourite lieutenant of Deshabandhu, was playing a prominent part in the controversy. more>>

Berlin Radio

In an article dealing wiih Mr Subhas Chandra Bose's arrival in Japan and his reception by Prime Minister Tojo, the Deutsche Diplomatische Korrespondenz points out that this is a political event which has aroused much attention in Europe and East Asia. The correspondent writes that Subhas Chandra Bose is the only Indian nationalist leader who is still at liberty. Both in Berlin and Rome, Bose proved to be an intelligent and eloquent advocate of Indian independence, and he gained many friends in these countries. He was received on several occasions by the Reich Foreign Minister, and later on also by the Fuehrer and the Duce. While in Europe he gained the conviction that the people of the Tripartite Powers and the Indian people are natural allies in their common battle against British Imperialism. Although Germany was sorry to see Bose leave, the reasons which have called him back to East Asia find full appreciation. India has become the neighbour of the Japanese sphere of interest, and the unparalleled victories of Japan in South-East Asia have given the Indian independence movement a new impetus. Bose is finding manifold and far-reaching tasks to solve in East Asia, when in his recent speech Prime Minister Tojo promised the Indian people that Japan would exhaust all possibilities and means to assist India in ridding herself of alien rule, and from past experiences in East Asia, the Indians know that Japanese promises are invariably followed by deeds. The motives of Subhas Chandra Bose's trip to Japan, and the fact that he was accorded and received a welcome wherever he made a stop is added proof for the Indian people that the war has stopped to be an Anglo-American one. It is needless to add in this connection that the British authorities in India will not be delighted to hear of Bose's return. The situation in India has not improved in any way in favour of the British. India is an example of Britain's incapability of finding a solution for the Indian problem. A powerful effort directed towards regeneration and liberation from the alien regime must of necessity come from the Indian people themselves. There can be no doubt that this process is in full swing, and that under the leadership of true Indian patriots, such as Bose, the Indian movement of Independence will result in the final liberation of the Indian people.
—BERLIN RADIO, June 19, 1943